Blog Archives

Gregory J. Scott will explore the three most prevalent architectural styles of the time: Germanic, Traditional English and Georgian including Lancaster City and the surrounding countryside.  
This event will be held in the Rock Ford Barn. No reservations required.  Seating is limited.

Admission: $5 for non-members.  Free for members of the Rock Ford Foundation.

Scott is a senior partner in the architectural firm of RLPS Architects located in Lancaster County, PA. and is a graduate of Penn State University with a Bachelors of Architecture degree.  He holds professional affiliations with the American Institute of Architects, Leading Age and the National Hospice Organization.  In addition to practicing architecture, Gregg  writes a monthly architectural design column for Lancaster Newspapers entitled Design Intervention

This popular children’s event is geared toward ages 4 and up. Children will use their artistic talents, play games and have fun in a series of activity stations. A story about George Washington will help children to understand why we continue to celebrate his birthday. During the special visit from “George Washington,” children will sing “Happy Birthday!” and enjoy cake and ice cream. Pretzels and beverages will also be served.
This event will be held in the Rock Ford Barn.
Reservations required.  $10 per child and $5 per adult.  Parent(s) must accompany their children.
Call 717-392-7223 for reservations.
Snow date: Sunday, March 5.

Join us on a journey back to February 1857. During your tour you will “visit” both Wheatland and the White House in 1857.  At Wheatland you will bear witness to James Buchanan’s encounter with a mysterious disease he contracted in January while staying in Washington, DC.  Moving along to President Buchanan’s White House after his March 1857 inauguration, you will be party to the struggle faced by the President and his advisors as they discuss how to manage the nation’s reaction to the Supreme Court’s ruling on the Dred Scott case.

The Presidents Day Living History at Wheatland takes place on Monday, February 20, 2017 with tours on the hour at 10am, 11am, 1pm, 2pm, and 3pm. We strongly advise making reservations in advance for your tour since tours do fill up and walk-in space is not guaranteed. Please arrive 15 minutes prior to your tour so you may use the facilities and check in.

Visit LancasterHistory.org/events or call 717-392-4633 to purchase your tickets. Your purchase of a ticket includes admission to the exhibition galleries.

On Thursday, February 16, 2017, in honor of Black History Month, LancasterHistory.org will host a special screening of the locally produced short film Carry Me Home — A Tribute to Harriet TubmanCarry Me Home depicts the life and faith of Harriet Tubman, who helped to set more than 300 slaves free through the Underground Railroad in the 1800s. Based on a true story, the film zeroes in on a real-life encounter between Tubman and Maria Ennals, who was a slave in the South during the mid-1800s. Tubman leads Ennals and her family through life-threatening trials causing them all to question whether or not freedom is worth the price they must pay to obtain it. A panel discussion will follow the film.

Carry Me Home was developed by Dayspring Christian Academy in partnership with LampHouse Films, Lancaster, as part of their Remember America initiative. The film’s director, Josh Henry, and director of photography, Michael Schmucker, are both Dayspring graduates, and they worked alongside current Dayspring faculty and staff on the film. Director Josh Henry will participate on the panel.

The film screening and panel discussion of Carry Me Home will take place on Thursday, February 16, 2017 in Ryder Hall at LancasterHistory.org, 230 N President Avenue, Lancaster, PA. A social gathering will begin at 4pm, followed by the film screening and panel discussion at 4:30pm. The event is free and open to the public.

On Thursday, February 2, 2017, in honor of Black History Month, LancasterHistory.org will welcome M. Alison Kibler of Franklin & Marshall College for the lecture Protests at Rocky Springs — The Integration of Lancaster’s Swimming Pools. The historic protests demanding swimming pool integration at three Lancaster pools – Rocky Springs, Maple Grove, and Brookside – are the focus of this lecture. A panel discussion will follow, featuring guests who will share their recollections of the 1963 protest, including Dr. Leroy Hopkins, Rev. A.L. Stephens, Louise Williams, Nelson Polite Jr., and Attorney Robert Pfannebecker.

The lecture Protests at Rocky Springs will take place on Thursday, February 2, 2017 in Ryder Hall at LancasterHistory.org, 230 N President Avenue in Lancaster, PA. A social gathering will begin at 4pm, followed by the lecture and panel at 4:30pm. The event is free and open to the public.

On Thursday January 19th, LancasterHistory.org will host Michael Showalter to kick off its 2017 Regional History Colloquium series with Room Enough for them All: The People of Lancaster County on the Eve of Revolution. Showalter is a museum educator at Ephrata Cloister, and will share the history of the various religious groups that sought freedom in mid-18th century Lancaster County.

By the middle of the 1750s, Lancaster County had become one of the most diverse places in all of the American Colonies. This mix of cultures and customs was created by Penn’s policies of religious toleration, vast natural resources, and a spirit of cooperation. Who were these people and what was their life like? Looking at tax records, church histories, travel accounts, local histories, and family traditions, this presentation will examine some information about the early residents of the county.

Michael S. Showalter is the Museum Educator at the historic Ephrata Cloister. He holds a BA in History from Millersville University and a MA from Penn State University in American Studies. He began volunteering at the historic Ephrata Cloister while still in high school, and has worked at the Cornwall Iron Furnace and The State Museum of Pennsylvania. He has been on the staff at historic Ephrata Cloister in 1996. In addition to leading tours at the site, he oversees the educational programs, public events, and manages the volunteer program at the site.

The colloquium Room Enough for them All will take place on Thursday, January 19, 2017 in Ryder Hall at LancasterHistory.org, 230 N President Avenue, Lancaster. A social gathering with refreshments will begin at 4pm, followed by the lecture from 4:30-5:30pm. The colloquium is free and open to the public.

dolores_parsilJohn Piersol McCaskey was among the first to collect and publish songs for the American public in the 19th century. Once McCaskey was able to convince Harper and Brothers publishing company that such song books would sell, his many songbooks sold in the hundreds of thousands and graced parlor pianos throughout the country. With Christmas, McCaskey’s favorite holiday, came a new host of opportunities including compiling a Christmas book, scheduling annual parties and programs for school students, and preserving the songs of the season in his music books. At this colloquium, local author Dolores Parsil will discuss McCaskey’s contributions to American music, love for the Christmas holidays, and uncanny connection to the song Jolly Old St. Nicholas.
Dolores Parsil, B.S. East Stroudsburg University, and M.A., University of Cincinnati, is a retired McCaskey High School communication arts teacher. She resides in Lancaster with her husband, Wayne. Parsil will be available before and after the lecture to sign copies of her biography of McCaskey, Lancaster’s Good Man, John Piersol McCaskey, available for purchase at the LancasterHistory.org Museum Store.
The colloquium Lancaster’s Music Man will take place on Thursday, December 15, 2016 in Ryder Hall at LancasterHistory.org, 230 North President Avenue, Lancaster. A social gathering with refreshments will begin at 4pm, followed by the lecture from 4:30-5:30pm. This event is free and open to the public.

a11m9yqucdl-_ux250_At this November colloquium, Patrick Spero, Ph.D. will discuss his new publication Frontier Country: The Politics of War in Early Pennsylvania. “In Frontier Country, Spero addresses one of the most controversial subjects in American history: the frontier. Countering the modern conception of the American frontier as an area of expansion, Spero employs the eighteenth-century meaning of the term to show colonists understood it as a vulnerable, militarized boundary. The Pennsylvania frontier, Spero argues, was constituted through conflicts not only between colonists and Native Americans but also among neighboring British colonies. These violent encounters created what Spero describes as a distinctive ‘frontier society’ on the eve of the American Revolution that transformed the once-peaceful colony of Pennsylvania into a ‘frontier county'” (Frontier Country).

Patrick Spero, Ph.D. is the Librarian and Director of the American Philosophical Society. Frontier Country is the first book written by Spero and is a volume in the University of Pennsylvania’s Penn Press Early American Studies series. Previously he was the co-editor of the anthology The American Revolution Reborn: New Perspective for the 21st Century. Spero earned his Ph.D. in History at the University of Pennsylvania and has since held roles there as professor, essayist, and lecturer, specializing in the era of the American Revolution.

The colloquium Frontier Country will take place on Thursday, November 17, 2016 in Ryder Hall at LancasterHistory.org, 230 N President Avenue, Lancaster. A social gathering with refreshments and a booksigning by the author will begin at 4pm, followed by the lecture from 4:30-5:30pm. This event is free and open to the public.

balcerski_tomThomas Balcerski, Ph.D. will conclude the Presidential Lecture Series for 2016 with his discussion on James Buchanan & The Onset of Reconstruction in the South. Although often overlooked, James Buchanan lived during the first three years of the federal reconstruction in the South. Firmly situated at Wheatland, his home near Lancaster, Buchanan wrote letters to fellow Democrats about the state of affairs in the postwar nation. The talk will assess Buchanan’s contribution to national politics in his final three years (1865-1868) and consider more broadly the rhetoric of the Democratic Party at the outset of Reconstruction. Old Buck, as it turns out, was ahead of the curve of the national mood.

Thomas Balcerski, Ph.D. is currently the Assistant Professor of History at Eastern Connecticut State University. He graduated from Cornell University in 2005 with undergraduate degrees in Economics and American Studies. Next, he attended Stony Brook University and competed a MA in History. He then earned a Ph.D. in History from Cornell University in 2014. His research and teaching interests include early American history, politics, and manhood.

The Presidential Lecture James Buchanan & The Onset of Reconstruction in the South will take place on Thursday, November 10, 2016 in Ryder Hall at LancasterHistory.org, 230 N President Avenue, Lancaster. A social gathering with refreshments will begin at 4pm, followed by the lecture from 4:30-5:30pm. This event is free and open to the public.

diggins_wiltPublic historian and researcher Milt Diggins will discuss his new publication Stealing Freedom Along the Mason-Dixon Line: Thomas McCreary, the Notorious Slave Catcher from Maryland at this October Regional History Colloquium. “Thomas McCreary was a slave catcher and kidnapper unconcerned for the difference between the two activities. He lived in Cecil County, Maryland, the mid-point between Philadelphia, a refuge for freedom seekers, and Baltimore, a major slave market. McCreary and his community provide a close up view of the toxic effects the debate over slavery had on the country in the years leading up to the Civil War” (Diggins). Diggins’ presentation will shed light on the fascinating historical figure who earned a living hunting down escaped slaves around the Philadelphia area in the decades preceding the Civil War. McCreary’s story collides with Lancaster’s at the Christiana Resistance and its aftermath.

Milt Diggins, M.ed., is an independent scholar, author, public historian, and lecturer from Cecil County, Maryland. He serves on the Historical Society of Cecil County Board of Trustees and has taught in the county’s public school and community college. Stealing Freedom is Diggins’ second book, after Images of America: Cecil County. He has also been published in Cecil Historical JournalMaryland Historical Magazine, and Cecil Whig.

The colloquium Stealing Freedom Along the Mason-Dixon Line will take place on Thursday, October 27, 2016 in Ryder Hall at LancasterHistory.org, 230 N President Avenue, Lancaster. A social gathering with refreshments and a booksigning by the author will begin at 4pm, followed by the lecture from 4:30-5:30pm. This event is free and open to the public.